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Retirement Certainty Scorecard™

 
  DISAGREE AGREE
Indicate the degree to which you agree or disagree with the statements below.
1

I have a clear, written and actionable retirement plan that shows my current financial position (Point A) and my ultimate future (Point B) and sets a path to get from A to B.

2

I review my written retirement plan each and every year and adjust it for changes in my life. I stress test my plan's viability by changing variables for the worst case scenario.

3

I know exactly what my personal required rate of return (PRROR) is that will allow me to achieve all of my retirement goals. I plan my investment strategy around and work toward that PRROR.

4

I have an investment plan which focuses an equal amount of time on making money as it does on not losing it, simultaneously advancing and protecting my assets.

5

I know that I am utilizing independent advice and strategies which specifically fit my individual situation.

6

I review all of my investments each and every year based on how the market and economy are responding and make adjustments and/or rebalances at least annually or as needed.

7

I am confident with all of my insurances knowing that the way they are positioned and funded will protect me and my family for any unforeseen negative events.

8

I am confident that my estate planning documents and beneficiary designations are all set up to maximize the benefits that my family receives.

9

I am well qualified or utilizing professionals that are well qualified to give the best possible advice for my retirement, investment, estate and tax planning.

10

My retirement planning is set up (by me or my advisor) in a way that requires little daily, weekly or monthly attention so that I can enjoy life to its fullest.

As I consider everything that will allow me to live most comfortably during my retirement, the thing that keeps me up at night is:

Thank you for completing the Retirement Certainty Scorecard™.

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NEWSROOM - ARTICLES

In the news, Campbell Wealth Management.

September 2, 2016

READY FOR ROTH?

READY FOR ROTH?

by Kelly Campbell

CFP®,CMFC®,ChFC®,AIF®

 

Last week, I conducted one of my regular financial seminars on dynamic strategies for retirement. We covered financial planning, Social Security, the stock market, retirement income and naming legacies, among other topics.

The subject that got the most attention? Roth 401 (k)s.

A little background: first introduced in 1998, the Roth IRA calls for individuals, who have earned income to voluntarily contribute post-tax funds to an individual retirement account (RothIRA). While Roth IRAs are typically for individuals, the Roth 401(k) is sponsored by a company for its employees. In contrast to the standard 401(k) plan, the Roth 401(k) plan requires post-tax contributions, but allows for tax free growth and distribution, provided the contributions have been invested for at least five years and the account owner has reached age 59½.

The IRS sets a limit on the amount of funds deferred in this way, and includes a “catch up” provision for those over age 50, intended to allow older workers to save for their approaching retirement. These limits are periodically adjusted to reflect changes in the cost of living due to inflation.

Roth 401(k) plans have become more and more popular for high net worth investors for the following reason:

There is no income limit in 2016 that prevents high-earning participants from using them. The current contribution limit for Roth 401(k) plans is $18,000 per year, with an additional $6,000 catch-up contribution for participants age 50 and above.

More than half of employers offer both options these days, according to new research from global advisory firm Willis Towers Watson, yet less than 10 percent of employees on the receiving end are taking advantage of the Roth.

Roth 401(k) contributions are irrevocable – once money is invested into a Roth 401(k) account, it cannot be moved to a regular 401(k) account.

The bottom line? Qualified assets can be withdrawn along with investment earnings tax-free in retirement, whereas traditional 401(k) distributions are taxed as income. When you contribute to the standard 401(k) pretax, you’re not eliminating taxes. You’re postponing the tax until retirement, which can turn out to be a burden.

In retirement, you may have multiple sources of retirement income such as a Social Security benefit, retirement plan withdrawals and investment income from your taxable investment accounts. All of this taxable income can push you into a higher tax bracket and may also affect how your Social Security benefit is taxed.

Because taxes are one of the biggest expenses we have, it’s worth your time to plan for them. Investing in a Roth 401(k) and Roth IRA may free up your tax liability in retirement.

Which provides more of an opportunity to take that trip to Europe!

Call us today to see if you should consider utilizing a Roth 401(k).

 

Kelly Campbell is the founder and CEO of Campbell Wealth Management, a Top Rated* Virginia wealth management firm currently serving approximately 300 high net worth households, registered in more than 30 states. Campbell Wealth Management is a highly experienced firm in Northern Virginia that specializes in working with only seniors, retirees and those nearing retirement. Kelly is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ Professional, Chartered Financial Consultant, Chartered Mutual Fund Counselor, and Accredited Investment Fiduciary with more than 23 years of holistic financial planning experience.

*Barron’s top 1,200 financial advisor is based on assets under management, revenue produced for the firm, regulatory record, quality of practice and philanthropic work.

The FT Times 400 2015 is based on representatives with basic qualifications of 10+ years of experience and $200 million or more in assets under management. The advisors are then graded on six broad factors and calculated a numeric score for each advisor. Areas of consideration include advisor AUM, asset growth, years of experience, industry certification, compliance record, and online accessibility. No more than 65% of a rep’s assets can be institutional. Only those who applied were considered.

 

August 22, 2016

TOP MISTAKES WHEN IT COMES TO MEDICARE

TOP MISTAKES WHEN IT COMES TO MEDICARE

by Kelly Campbell

CFP®, CMFC®, ChFC®, AIF®

 

Every day, 10,000 retirees (or about to be retirees) are eligible for Medicare, according to The Washington Post.

But most don’t take the time or trouble to really understand the system, as well as the choices. And many make common mistakes.

When I create a financial plan for my clients, I always address their questions about Medicare. Avoiding errors can make a difference between financial and health confidence, or not.

Q: Have I worked long enough to qualify?

Earning 40 credits by paying payroll taxes at work — about 10 years’ work — guarantees that you won’t have to pay premiums for Part A services (mainly hospital insurance). But you don’t need any work credits to qualify for Part B (doctors’ services, outpatient care, medical equipment) and Part D (prescription drugs), if you are 65 or older, and a U.S. citizen or a legal resident who’s lived in the United States for at least five years. You may also qualify for Part A benefits on your spouse’s work record, or you can pay premiums for them.

Q: Do I need to enroll in Part B?

If you don’t, you risk late penalties, in the form of surcharges added to your premiums for all future years, and delays of several months before coverage kicks in. If you have health coverage beyond age 65 from an employer for which you (or your spouse) actively work, and the employer has 20 or more workers, you can delay Part B enrollment without penalty until the job ends. Otherwise, you need to sign up during your seven-month initial enrollment period — which includes the month you turn 65, three months before and three months after.

Q: Am I eligible for Medicare at the same time as Social Security?

You don’t need to wait until you retire and are collecting Social Security benefits to enroll in Medicare.

Under Social Security, full retirement age for most people is now 66, which will gradually increase to 67 for those who were born after 1959. Unless you are covered by an employer, you should sign up for Medicare at age 65.

Q: Do I really need Part D if I’m not on medications?

I tell my clients that they are not fortune tellers. Always expect the unexpected. Unforeseen illnesses can arise any time, and require costly drugs. Certain cancer drugs can run thousands of dollars each month. Part D does not let you wait to sign up until you need it.

Q: What about enrollment periods?

You may have read about “open enrollment” and gotten the idea that this is the only time you can sign up for Medicare. False. In Medicare, open annual enrollment (October 15 to December 7) is for those already in the program and want to change their coverage for the following year.

When you sign up initially, you get your own enrollment period — either around the time that you turn 65, or throughout the time you have your own health coverage from your employment or your spouse’s employment, and for up to eight months after it ends.

If you miss your personal deadlines because you’re waiting for open enrollment, you risk delayed coverage and permanent late penalties.

Q: What is an Annual Notice of Change?

This letter comes in the mail each September if you’re enrolled in a Medicare Advantage plan (HMO or PPO) or a Part D prescription drug plan. It details what changes the plan will make in its costs and coverage for the following year. You can then compare it with other plans during open enrollment and change if you expect your current plan will increase.

 

If you are near, or in, retirement please call us for more information and if you would like to schedule a consultation please call our office.

Kelly Campbell, CEO of Campbell Wealth Management, has more than twenty years’ experience as a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ Practitioner. He is also the author of “Fire Your Broker”, informational strategies that seek to build wealth.

 

 

 

 

August 15, 2016

SHOULD YOU RETIRE NOW AND PURSUE YOUR DREAMS?

SHOULD YOU RETIRE NOW AND PURSUE YOUR DREAMS?

By Kelly Campbell

CFP®,CMFC®,ChFC®,AIF®

 

As a financial planner, whenever I give a seminar about retirement, I am always intrigued by someone’s “bucket list.” What exactly is your passion? What have you always wanted to pursue but didn’t have the time or energy? Sometimes it’s thrill seeking—zip lining in the rain forest, skydiving from 13,000 feet, scuba diving in the Maldives—or widening your horizons by hiking the Great Wall of China.

Fact: Almost half of baby boomers who are currently in the workforce say they now expect to retire later than they previously thought, according to a survey by The Associated Press. And a recent AARP survey revealed that 70 percent of Americans, aged 45 to 74, plan to continue working, not only because they need the income and health benefits, but they enjoy what they do.

If you are financially secure and work with a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER (T), is postponing your retirement the best idea?

Certainly, delaying taking your Social Security benefits until the age of 70 means your benefits will increase. But what about your lifestyle?

Knowing what someone really wants to do with the last third of their life is a huge part of being a financial advisor. A woman lawyer recently came to see me and said she was basically sick of her job and wanted to retire. I asked her what she had always wanted to do. She thought for a moment and replied, “I want to work with kids and teach biology.” I created a plan for her which helped her pursue her lifelong dreams.

Another client’s dream was to move to the beach and open a pizza parlor, fulfilling two goals. We structured his plan to make sure he had enough assets to pursue this dream.

Seniors I know have also left high pressure office jobs to become valued volunteers in their communities: serving on boards, teaching courses at community colleges, coaching sports and becoming mentors.

Retirement isn’t about doing or not doing. It’s about being. It’s about becoming.

If you don’t already have a meaningful “Bucket List Strategy”, it’s time to consider one. Because life is not about money and jobs, it’s about family, friends and pursuing your dreams. There is nothing in my profession more thrilling than helping someone get in touch with a future that really has meaning for them. When I can help an investor see life ahead with excitement rather than fear, there is no greater reward.

 

August 10, 2016

HEIR CARE: FINANCIAL PLANNING FOR FUTURE GENERATIONS

HEIR CARE: FINANCIAL PLANNING FOR FUTURE GENERATIONS

In 1877, at the time of his death, Cornelius “Commodore” Vanderbilt was worth $100 million, according to Forbes, thanks to his steamship and railroad empire. In todays’ money, that figure would be roughly $200 billion, according to Coin Talk.

But six generations later, as a result of family members squandering their fortunes on lavish mansions in New York City and Newport, Rhode Island, the money is gone. CNN anchor Anderson Cooper, son of Gloria Vanderbilt, said on Howard Stern’s radio show, “My mom’s made clear to me that there’s no trust fund.”

Huntington Hartford, the 1950’s notorious playboy, art collector and yachtsman was heir to the A&P grocery chain fortune. He had a 150-acre estate in New Jersey, another estate in Hollywood, a residence in London, and a house and a resort on Paradise Island in the Bahamas, the latter of which ended up costing him between $25 to $30 million and was never profitable. He was divorced four times, no doubt draining his assets. He lost his millions and later declared bankruptcy.

Bad investments, taking on too much debt and lack of financial literacy can drain a family’s portfolio.

For financial advisors, building lasting relationships with entire families can mean the difference between sustaining long-term financial health for coming generations, or watching the funds disappear.

According to a recent study by the global investment and research firm AllianceBernstein, more than 60 percent of wealthy families exhaust the greater parts of their assets by the second generation. By the third generation, nine out of ten fortunes are gone.

A new survey by US Trust shows that few wealthy people have developed plans to preserve and pass on their assets to either their children or charity. Less than a third of the respondents strongly agreed that their children would be able to handle the inheritance they plan to leave them. Almost one-quarter of baby boomers think their children will not be able to handle wealth properly until the age of 40. And almost half of wealthy individuals over 70 agree.

What psychologists call “sudden wealth syndrome” can be exhilarating, resulting in spending sprees that include new cars, vacation homes, luxury goods and private planes, to name a few of the extravagances I’ve seen over the years.

Fearing that, many of the wealthy—including Warren Buffet, Bill Gates and Sting—have already told their children not to expect trust funds.

Over the next 30 years, an epic $30 trillion will be passed down from baby boomers to Generation X to millennials. In that enormous transfer of wealth, many investment advisers will see their asset base evaporate because they don’t know how to connect with their clients’ children.

Sixty-six percent of children fire their parents’ financial adviser after they inherit their parents’ wealth, according to an InvestmentNews survey.

Affluent parents and their children need to be willing to talk about money and they should start by a meeting with their financial advisor.

You, your spouse and your financial planner need to give your kids a crash course in financial literacy. Many financial institutions offer specialized learning materials and courses to get heirs up to speed.

And don’t forget your grandchildren. Instill smart money lessons in them, and you have pushed family wealth forward another 30 or 40 years.

If you are really ready, discuss your will with family members. It’s proactive and can help avoid any issues when you’re not around to explain your decision making.

Ensuring a family’s financial security is a satisfying feeling. Not only for original person who accumulated wealth, but for their families.

 

August 8, 2016

ARE THE WEALTHY BETTER INVESTORS THAN THE AVERAGE RETIREE?

ARE THE WEALTHY BETTER INVESTORS THAN THE AVERAGE RETIREE?

by Kelly Campbell
CFP®, CMFC®,ChFC®,AIF®
 
At a recent seminar I gave, between the salad course and the filet, one of the attendees raised his hand. He was 67, had recently retired, and needed a financial advisor. He had received a sizeable pension, cashed in some stocks and a robust 401(k) and wanted to know how to grow his portfolio.
Previously, he and his wife had been very conservative with his investments, but now he was ready to venture out of his “asset comfort zone.”
It’s no secret that rich investors embrace risk. Are they really better investors?
I gave the man my strategies that aim to build wealth.
 
  • The average investor tends to panic when the market drops. According to a recent study by SigFig, an investment management firm in San Francisco, high net investors were less likely to sell for losses but rather wait for a correction. Since the 2008 market crash, those who waited out the financial storm have recouped their losses. In the words of Warren Buffet, “Only buy something that you’d be perfectly happy to hold if the market shut down for 10 years.”
  • Wealthy investors have the three P’s: patience, positivity and a plan. They also tend to work with trusted, CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNERs™ and listen to investment advice.
  • Churning your portfolio at high rates can spell disaster. According to the Sig Fig study, the less wealthy investor turns over their portfolios four times more than wealthier investors.
  • High net investors, in my experience, have cooler heads than the average investor. They are not as likely to get emotionally involved. They tend to be more logical and not follow the herd.
  • Nobody likes to pay taxes, yet many investors need to learn more about the tax ramifications of their investments. That’s where a trusted financial advisor can make a difference.  
 
This material is for general information only and is not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. Historical performance is no guarantee of future results.
 

August 2, 2016

Happy Birthday to Social Security…and Best Wishes for Many More

Happy Birthday to Social Security…and Best Wishes for Many More

By Kelly Campbell

CFP®,CMFC®, ChFC®, AIF®

 

This month marks the 81st anniversary of Social Security.

For retirees, it’s important to keep abreast of how changes in the system can impact your retirement benefits.

On October 29, 1929 the stock market crashed. Known as “Black Tuesday”, it sent shockwaves through the financial world and through the lives of most Americans. Unemployment rose to 25 percent. Gas was 10 cents a gallon, bread was 8 cents a loaf and the average cost of a new house was $3,400.

President Franklin Delano Roosevelt signed the Social Security Act in 1935 at the height of the Great Depression when older Americans were so adversely affected. Two years later, taxes were being withheld from paychecks. In January 1940, the first recipient of the recurring monthly benefit was former legal secretary Ida May Fuller, who at age 66, cashed check #00-000-001 in the amount of $22.54. (According to Saving.org that figure would today be $388.32.)

Last year alone, almost 60 million people –nearly 60 percent women–received Social Security benefits. As of June, 2016, the average monthly payment for retired workers was $1,300, according to the Social Security website.

 

Q. Do I have to worry about Social Security running out of money?

Like Medicare, Social Security operates like a trust fund. The trustees are required to issue a yearly report. According to the most recent report: “The combined trust fund reserves are still growing and will continue to do so through 2019. Beginning with 2020, the cost of the program is projected to exceed income. “

The projected point at which the combined trust fund reserves will become depleted, if Congress does not act before then, comes in 2034. At that time, there will be sufficient income coming in to pay only 79 percent of scheduled benefits, according to The Washington Post.

 

Q. What if Congress fails to act?

According to the latest statistics, the benefit you expected to receive in 2034 will be reduced by 21 percent. So, if you were expecting to receive $1,000 a month, under current Social Security laws, you would receive just $790 a month, or $210 less a month than you were expecting.

 

Q. It sounds like my children will be affected?

Most likely. Your children will probably still benefit from Social Security, but the program will definitely change in the future. Regardless of any action by lawmakers, the recommendation is simply to try to save more for your own retirement, starting as early as possible.

 

Q. So I should definitely file for Social Security before my full retirement age?

Not necessarily. I do recommend being patient and having a definite, written plan for retirement with the help of a professional and trustworthy financial services firm. If you claim Social Security before your full retirement age (FRA), your benefit will be reduced permanently. The amount it is reduced depends on your FRA and your age when you claim Social Security. For example, if you were born in 1950, your FRA would be age 66. But if you claim Social Security at age 62, you would receive 25 percent less, according to the Social Security Administration. If you wait until age 70, your benefits would be 32 percent higher, almost one third.

I truly believe that with the proper planning, you can maximize your benefits and retire with confidence. Meet with your advisor today.

 

August 2, 2016

THE TOP FIVE MISTAKES WHEN IT COMES TO RETIREMENT INVESTING

THE TOP FIVE MISTAKES WHEN IT COMES TO RETIREMENT INVESTING

by Kelly Campbell

Campbell Wealth Management CEO

CFP®, CMFC,® ChFC,® AIF®

 

I work closely with extremely smart and successful business executives and their families and I’m always surprised by how much they need to learn about post-retirement investing. They may have followed the golden rules: owned stocks, started saving 10 percent of their salary in their twenties, diversified their holdings.

But in my years of financial “coaching”, I’ve learned a few simple things to avoid.

The biggest mistakes you and your financial advisor make is failing to expect the unexpected. It could actually cost you your hard earned nest egg. Here are the five most costly blunders:

1. Failing to Plan      

Pursuing your retirement goals depends on how well you have created a      “GPS” system—a literal road map of targeted opportunities. 80 may be the new 60, but not when it comes to retirement. Everyone, no matter the age, needs a written retirement plan they can follow.

2. Failing to Review

Creating your portfolio is just the first step. Failing to conduct a semi-annual or annual review is simply irresponsible. Even if you trust your advisor, adopt the “no surprise” rule. Be pro-active.

3. Failing to Minimize Risk

We all wish we had bought Apple stock decades ago, but the truth is, the stock market is volatile. Talk to your financial advisor about other options to manage risk and help you plan for protection. Adopt the long view and have a plan for good markets and bad ones.

4. Failing to Create Cash Flow System

Many people I meet with have never really sat down and estimated when and where to get income. It’s not only important to create a budget, but also to fully understand how you will get your retirement resources each year.

5. Failing to Get Professional Advice

Planning for retirement often involves many moving parts: stocks, bonds, taxes, health insurance, Social Security, pensions and other assets. It’s important to find a financial services advisor who specializes in retirement planning and has the solid experience to address your financial objectives.

 

 

July 27, 2016

SILLY LOVE SONGS: What We Didn’t Know 40 Years Ago

SILLY LOVE SONGS: What We Didn’t Know 40 Years Ago

By Kelly Campbell

CEO Campbell Wealth Management

CFP®, CMFC®, ChFC®, AIF®

 

 

Forty years ago, you paid $2.00 to see “Rocky”, marveled at a 14-year-old Nadia Comaneci who scored the first 10 in Olympic history, discoed to Wings’ “Silly Love Songs” and ate a frozen TV dinner watching “The Mary Tyler Moore Show.”

Chances are, you also were embarking on your career, planning a family and watching your parents retire.

The thought of your own retirement was inconceivable, as the years stretched ahead seeming without end. Retirement was for old people. Maybe you started investing. Paid into 401(k)’s and IRA’s.  Bought and sold real estate. Put your kids through college. Maybe divorced and remarried.

Flash forward: approximately 10,000 Americans retire every day, according to The Washington Post, and that means the baby boomers are officially leaving the work force in droves and looking for financial stability. Unless you won the lottery, failing to plan for the next stage of your life can be frightening.

Yes, it does pay to start early (something to pass on your children). Let’s assume you earn 7 percent return. If you were 25 and invested a fixed amount each month for 10 years and then stopped, you would still be ahead of a person who starts at 35 and invests for the same amount each month for the rest of his life.

In my experience, most people just don’t know how to handle the idea of retirement. Maybe it’s denial, or the fact that boomers are staying in the work force longer? Is 80 the new 60? Not when it comes to financial security.

Medicare, Social Security, taxes and penalties can also make things confusing.

There’s quite a lot to think about when planning for retirement, including:

 

  • Building the value of your portfolio
  • Producing income
  • Preserving your principal

 

The first thing retirees should do, but often fail to, is reduce expenses. Another first step is to ensure that your portfolio is diversified. Interest rates have fallen to historically low levels, with many governments issuing bonds with negative rates and 10-year U.S. Treasury notes yielding less than 1.6%. As a result, yield-hungry investors have bought stocks with high dividend yields, driving the S&P 500 Index to record levels, according to MarketWatch. Then talk to a trusted financial advisor and ask the following questions:

Start by asking yourself: How much income do I need? How much risk am I willing to take?

  • Does the advisor provide you with a personal financial plan?
  • Does the advisor have the vision and planning skills to provide you with a retirement income strategy?
  • Is your advisor certified CFP®, CMFC®, ChFC®, AIF®?

 

If not, call our office and ask about Right On Retirement personalized plan to help you retire in confidence.

 

September 17, 2015

5 End-Of-Summer Planning Tips for Boomers

5 End-Of-Summer Planning Tips for Boomers

As you swap your summer and winter wardrobes, you should take time to clean up your portfolio.

July 1, 2015

5 Ways to Retire Early

5 Ways to Retire Early

You may be able to retire sooner than you think by employing these strategies.

June 17, 2015

How to Maximize Your 401(k) When You’re on the Verge of Retirement

How to Maximize Your 401(k) When You’re on the Verge of Retirement

The countdown to retirement has begun, so manage your retirement plan wisely.

May 29, 2015

5 Reasons Every Boomer Should Stick to a Budget

5 Reasons Every Boomer Should Stick to a Budget

When you’re nearing or in retirement, it’s more important than ever to improve your budgeting skills.

May 13, 2015

Creating a Vision for Retirement

Creating a Vision for Retirement

Preparing for retirement goes beyond the numbers. How do you want to spend your time?

April 29, 2015

5 Reasons Boomers Should Consider a Roth

5 Reasons Boomers Should Consider a Roth

If you have an investing time horizon of 10 years or more, it makes sense to consider a Roth.

April 20, 2015

5 Reasons to Skip the Roth IRA

5 Reasons to Skip the Roth IRA

Roths have great tax advantages, but they aren’t for everyone.

March 13, 2015

How to Spring Clean Your Finances for Retirement

How to Spring Clean Your Finances for Retirement

While you spruce up your home, consider doing the same for your portfolio.

February 19, 2015

How to Prepare for a Storm in Your Retirement Forecast

How to Prepare for a Storm in Your Retirement Forecast

Is your retirement plan prepared for bad weather?

February 13, 2015

3 Big Investing Factors to Consider in 2015

3 Big Investing Factors to Consider in 2015

We’re seeing some repeated themes from last year: oil prices, rising interest rates and a strong dollar.

January 22, 2015

This Simple Savings Rule Will Help You Accumulate Wealth

This Simple Savings Rule Will Help You Accumulate Wealth

You can grow your wealth if you exercise discipline and stay consistent.

January 14, 2015

Top 5 Financial Goals You Should Consider for 2015

Top 5 Financial Goals You Should Consider for 2015

Celebrate the new by adding financial goals to your New Year’s resolutions.

December 27, 2014

Have Bonds Lost Their Safety?

Have Bonds Lost Their Safety?

Investors may want to consider shorter duration bonds.

December 9, 2014

9 Last-Minute Tax Strategies for 2014

9 Last-Minute Tax Strategies for 2014

The end of the year is the perfect time to get all of your tax strategy ducks in a row. Consider running a “mock” tax return so you know your potential tax liability.

November 21, 2014

5 Questions to Ask When You Rebalance a Portfolio

5 Questions to Ask When You Rebalance a Portfolio

Don’t simply look at performance. Fees and turnover ratios are important factors to consider.

November 1, 2014

Vet Your Financial Advisor in 3 Easy Steps

Vet Your Financial Advisor in 3 Easy Steps

How your financial advisor is paid tells you a lot about his or her responsibilities.

October 10, 2014

Retirees Should Invest for Total Return

Retirees Should Invest for Total Return

If you’re not looking at total return, you’re not seeing the whole picture.

October 10, 2014

8 Retirement Milestones That Affect Your Investment Decisions

8 Retirement Milestones That Affect Your Investment Decisions

Factor these ages into your retirement planning.

September 28, 2014

3 Questions to Ask Before Choosing a Retirement Portfolio

3 Questions to Ask Before Choosing a Retirement Portfolio

Taking your investment strategy and time horizon into account will help you decide on allocations.

September 19, 2014

3 Ways to Maximize Your 401(k)

3 Ways to Maximize Your 401(k)

If you change your funds on a weekly basis, you’ll likely underperform your index benchmark.

 

September 13, 2014

How to Navigate the Complicated World of 401(k) Fees

How to Navigate the Complicated World of 401(k) Fees

Understanding fees and who pays them is essential to improving your returns.

September 13, 2014

5 Future 401(k) Changes to Look Out For

5 Future 401(k) Changes to Look Out For

The days of only being able to invest in stock or bond mutual funds within a traditional 401(k) model are over.


July 17, 2014

Top 7 Retirement Milestones You Need to Know

Top 7 Retirement Milestones You Need to Know

In this week’s post CEO Kelly Campbell examines several significant retirement milestones.

July 1, 2014

5 Common Mistakes You Make in Your Retirement Planning

5 Common Mistakes You Make in Your Retirement Planning

In his latest post, founder and CEO Kelly Campbell talks about the risks of not guarding against a market decline and buying long-term care insurance.

June 15, 2014

What to Do With Your Finances After Losing a Spouse

What to Do With Your Finances After Losing a Spouse

The loss of a spouse is never easy. In this week’s post Kelly Campbell the need to focus on getting your finances in order.

June 1, 2014

A Guide to the Relationship Between Bonds and Interest Rates

A Guide to the Relationship Between Bonds and Interest Rates

In his latest post, CEO and Founder, Kelly Campbell explains that bond prices and interest rates have an inverse relationship, and why this is important in a low interest rate environment.

May 20, 2014

5 Musts for a Successful Take-Off Into Retirement

5 Musts for a Successful Take-Off Into Retirement

In his latest post CEO, Kelly Campbell, discusses the 5 musts for a successful retirement. He emphasizes the creation of a financial plan as a corner stone of a successful retirement.

April 24, 2014

A Guide to Reverse Mortgages

A Guide to Reverse Mortgages

In recent years, questions about reverse mortgages, and whether or not they are a practical way to supplement retirement income, have become more frequent. In his latest post CEO, Kelly Campbell, dives into the details and specifics of reverse mortgages.

April 4, 2014

An Investor’s Perspective: Russia’s Invasion of Crimea

An Investor’s Perspective: Russia’s Invasion of Crimea

CWM’s Director of Investments, Glenn Guard, and provides his informed perspective on the continued dispute over Crimean and the possible economic fallout.

March 25, 2014

When to Consider Making a Roth IRA Conversion

When to Consider Making a Roth IRA Conversion

If you’re not sure if a Roth IRA is for you, consider some of these tax advantages. Founder and CEO, Kelly Campbell, provides specific criteria for when you should consider making a Roth conversion.

March 7, 2014

Ensure Your Retirement Income Isn’t Taxed to Death

Ensure Your Retirement Income Isn’t Taxed to Death

Knowing which accounts to access and when can play an important role in maximizing your retirement accounts. This week founder and CEO, Kelly Campbell, shows you how to keep your retirement income safe by following these guidelines.

February 24, 2014

Building True Relationships with Clients

Building True Relationships with Clients

Kelly Campbell, Founder and CEO, of Campbell Wealth Management elaborates on his 80/20 rule, and shares why it’s such an important part in building a lasting and trustworthy client/adviser relationship.

February 21, 2014

How to Balance College Costs With Retirement

How to Balance College Costs With Retirement

Saving for college is a priority for many parents, and this often takes precedent over putting money away for retirement. In this week’s post for U.S. News, Kelly Campbell takes a look at the best ways to balance saving for college and retirement.

February 17, 2014

Here’s How to Double Your Money

Here’s How to Double Your Money

Campbell Wealth’s Director of Investment Management, Glenn Guard, provides his thoughts on the direction of U.S. markets in 2014, and offers a few creative alternatives for investors seeking to avoid recent U.S. market volatility.

February 11, 2014

What to Know About ‘MyRA’ Retirement Accounts

What to Know About ‘MyRA’ Retirement Accounts

During the State of the Union address the President mentioned a new type of retirement savings account, called the “MyRA” account. In his latest post for U.S. News, Founder and CEO, Kelly Campbell, explains the specifics of this new account and shares his views on the future of the “MyRa.”

January 25, 2014

Which IRA Is Best for You: Roth or Traditional?

Which IRA Is Best for You: Roth or Traditional?

In his latest article for US News & World Report, Kelly Campbell, CEO of Campbell Wealth Management, gives a detailed analysis of the differences between a Roth and Traditional IRA, and offers specifics on which account is best for your unique situation.

January 9, 2014

5 Ways to Meet Your Financial Goals in 2014

5 Ways to Meet Your Financial Goals in 2014

In his latest article for US News & World Report, Kelly Campbell, CEO of Campbell Wealth Management, offers you some encouraging guidance on how to achieve your financial goals in the New Year.

December 27, 2013

5 Must-Do Retirement and Tax Planning Tips

5 Must-Do Retirement and Tax Planning Tips

In an article for US News & World Report, Kelly Campbell, CEO of Campbell Wealth Management, discusses strategies to help minimize your 2013 tax bill and offers advice on how to maximize your Retirement Savings.

November 5, 2013

Municipal Bonds And Rising Interest Rates

Municipal Bonds And Rising Interest Rates

Our Director of Investments, Glenn Guard, recently shared his thoughts on Municipal Bonds, and cautioned against owning muni bonds and bonds in a rising interest rate scenario.

May 30, 2012

Why Dividend Stocks Trump Treasuries

Why Dividend Stocks Trump Treasuries

Glenn Guard, Director of Investment Management, is featured in his own Forbes article on why dividend stocks trump treasuries.  Glenn discusses the Campbell Wealth team’s current investment philosophy and cites several examples to expand on his outlook.

May 22, 2012

Another Week Down for the Dow?

Another Week Down for the Dow?

Campbell Wealth’s Director of Investment Management, Glenn Guard, comments on market volatility for SmartMoney.  Glenn commented on recent U.S. market volatility resulting from ongoing concerns surrounding the Greek crisis and escalating uncertainty with the presidential election.  He went on to discuss the U.S. corporate landscape and provided his outlook for the U.S. economic picture moving forward.

April 24, 2012

HOW TO PLAY IT-Betting on Germany Despite Europe’s Pullback

HOW TO PLAY IT-Betting on Germany Despite Europe’s Pullback

Glenn Guard, Director of Investment Management at Campbell Wealth Management, is featured in an article published by Reuters.  Glenn comments on the current situation in Europe as well as incorporates the Campbell Wealth’s team investment philosophy into the discussion.

April 23, 2012

Paying Yourself When You Start a Business

Paying Yourself When You Start a Business

Richard Clement, Director of Financial Planning and Risk Management, is quoted in an article published by Bloomberg Business Week.  Richard explains why he believes that when starting out with a new business, it’s best to forgo removing funds immediately if you can.

April 4, 2012

U.S. Stocks Drop as Europe Worries Revisited

U.S. Stocks Drop as Europe Worries Revisited

Glenn Guard, Director of Investment Management, is the lead expert cited in an article by MarketWatch. Glenn discusses the current market environment, expresses his reaction to the latest labor data and what it means for the larger economic picture.

April 2, 2012

What Are Investment Strategies for 30-Somethings?

What Are Investment Strategies for 30-Somethings?

Chris Westerman, Director of Estate Planning at Campbell Wealth Management, is quoted in an article published by FOXBusiness.com.  Chris offers guidance on investment strategies in your 20’s versus your 30’s, advice on breaking out of debt in your 30’s and when people should start think about retirement in their 30’s.

March 29, 2012

U.S. Stocks Ends Mostly Lower; Dow Gains

U.S. Stocks Ends Mostly Lower; Dow Gains

Glenn Guard, Director of Investment Management at Campbell Wealth Management, is heavily quoted in an article by MarketWatch. Glenn provides his reaction to current jobless claims data, his thoughts on what the data means for the overall economic situation and how the markets may react at the opening.

January 23, 2012

How to Invest for Your Baby

How to Invest for Your Baby

Kelly Campbell, Founder and CEO, of Campbell Wealth Management is quoted in an article on FOXBusiness.com about the best investment options parents can consider for their baby.  Kelly recommends avoiding savings bonds as they typically make limited interest and often cannot outpace inflation.  He does suggest, however, that parents and family members contribute to a 529 college savings plan, as money put in these plans grows tax deferred and will not be taxed upon withdrawal as long as it is used for educational purposes.

December 22, 2011

Financial New Year’s Resolutions for 2012

Financial New Year’s Resolutions for 2012

Kelly Campbell, founder and CEO of Campbell Wealth Management, was featured in today’s Washington Post article titled “Financial New Year’s Resolutions for 2012”. Campbell offers his advice on how to tackle financial goals utilizing the acronym SMAC (Specific, Measurable, Achievable and Compatible).

December 6, 2011

Four ‘Musts’ to Achieve Your 2012 Financial Goals

Four ‘Musts’ to Achieve Your 2012 Financial Goals

In an article for US News & World Report, Kelly Campbell, founder and president of Campbell Wealth Management, discusses strategies to achieve 2012 financial resolutions. In order to complete goals, Campbell offers that investors be very specific and create measurable objectives. For example, rather than just setting a numerical goal for retirement, plan exactly how your retirement will look (travel, hobbies, housing plans, etc.) and calculate how much money you will need.

December 1, 2011

Kiplinger’s Retirement Report, December 2011

Kiplinger’s Retirement Report, December 2011

Rachel Sheedy of Kiplinger’s Retirement Report quotes Kelly Campbell, founder and president of Campbell Wealth Management, in an article about the increase in retirees making mortgage payments. The article highlights whether or not to pay off the loan, especially with current interest rates at historic lows. Campbell offers that having a mortgage in retirement often makes retirees feel uncomfortable and he advises them to try and pay off the mortgage before entering retirement.

December 1, 2011

SmartCEO December 2011

SmartCEO December 2011

Kelly Campbell, founder and president of Campbell Wealth Management, is featured in “The Economy Issue” of SmartCEO magazine. Campbell offers his insight on how business owners should prepare for a successful 2012, given economic hardship over the past few years. He explains that while it may be a sluggish year, there will be opportunities for business, especially wealth management firms. “We need to help people grow their investments. I can almost guarantee it’s going to be our best year,” he explains.

November 30, 2011

Shopping on Thanksgiving Is for the Birds

Shopping on Thanksgiving Is for the Birds

In an article written for US News & World Report, Kelly Campbell, founder and president of Campbell Wealth Management, writes about consumer spending this holiday season. With retailers opening doors earlier on Black Friday, reports show that it has helped businesses get sales back on track. According to studies, Black Friday sales for this year are up over seven percent and the shift represents a massive increase since 2007. “This really is amazing when you think of all the issues our economy has been facing,” Campbell says. “But through all of this, U.S. consumers still came out in droves to shop.”

November 30, 2011

How Much Is Enough?

How Much Is Enough?

In a financial literacy study released by Bankrate.com, Kelly Campbell, founder and president of Campbell Wealth Management, discusses investors’ current comfort level with debt compared to last year. He explains that investors should be aware that volatility is here to stay and a major focus needs to shift onto decreasing debt. “Your confidence can increase in this environment by thinking about things that hurt you in the future,” Campbell explains. “Debt will hurt you in the future if you have any kind of employment or stock market issue.”

November 16, 2011

What’s Your Budget for Risk?

What’s Your Budget for Risk?

In an article for US News & World Report, Kelly Campbell, founder and president of Campbell Wealth Management, discusses how investors can determine their portfolio’s risk. Campbell recommends including asset classes that are different from one another and that have varying levels of risk when trying to build a solid portfolio. “The more truly diverse the asset classes, the lower the standard deviation, the volatility and the risk,” Campbell explains. “A less risky portfolio helps you sleep better at night.”

November 8, 2011

Change Your Assumptions for Retirement

Change Your Assumptions for Retirement

Kelly Campbell, founder and president of Campbell Wealth Management, contributes an article for US News & World Report discussing how investors’ assumptions can make or break retirement plans. He highlights that inflation, rate of return and Social Security payments are often factors that heavily impact retirement funding. “Another major question in people’s retirement plans should be taxes,” Campbell says. “Making an educated guess of the new tax rates is very difficult, but extremely important. “Assuming a tax increase between 10 and 20 percent is probably wise.”

November 2, 2011

Three Reasons to Pay Off Your Mortgage

Three Reasons to Pay Off Your Mortgage

In a piece for US News & World Report, Kelly Campbell, founder and president of Campbell Wealth Management, explains reasons why people should consider paying their mortgage off early. Campbell explains that for most Americans, their biggest expense is a mortgage payment. He says, “Imagine going into retirement without mortgage debt. That would be the crème da la crème of retirement. Everything you make could go toward your basic needs and toward enjoying your retirement years.”

October 19, 2011

Unemployment: Cause or Symptom

Unemployment: Cause or Symptom

Kelly Campbell, founder and president of Campbell Wealth Management, contributes an article to US News & World Report about how unemployment has impacted the economy. Campbell argues that unemployment may be a symptom of the struggling economy but not the cause. Instead, he discusses that business confidence is the cause of the economies hardships and explains that for consumers, banks and businesses to bolster the economy, a sense of confidence for the future has to be instilled.

October 5, 2011

3 Questions You Need to Ask About Your Retirement

3 Questions You Need to Ask About Your Retirement

In an article for US News & World Report, Kelly Campbell, founder and president of Campbell Wealth Management, explains strategies that investors should consider for a successful retirement. Campbell offers that soon-to-be-retirees should have a solid retirement plan in place and adjust the plan to reflect inflation, taxes and other factors that could impact retirement. “Either find a good software program and put the plan together yourself or meet with a Certified Financial Planner that will put one together for you,” Campbell says.

September 28, 2011

3 Reasons to Hold Cash NOW

3 Reasons to Hold Cash NOW

Kelly Campbell, founder and president of Campbell Wealth Management, contributes an article to US News and World Report about why investors should hold cash in today’s market. Campbell explains that with the recent market volatility and stocks declining, a cash position may be beneficial to investors’ portfolios. He says, “Holding cash for a short-term need is always a good idea. We often tell our clients to hold three to six months of living expenses in cash for emergencies.”

September 21, 2011

3 High-Yielding Fixed-Income Investments

3 High-Yielding Fixed-Income Investments

US News & World Report runs an article written by Kelly Campbell, founder and president of Campbell Wealth Management, about high-yielding fixed-income investments. Given the volatile marketplace, Campbell explains alternative fixed-income investments that consumers may want to consider, such as REITS and variable annuities. “Each of these investments comes with different risks that need to be weighed against your risk tolerance,” he says. “Do your homework and always think of the long term.”

September 14, 2011

5 Reasons the Government Should Be Run Like a Business

5 Reasons the Government Should Be Run Like a Business

Kelly Campbell, founder and president of Campbell Wealth Management, contributes an article to US News & World Report about why the government should be run like a business. With the federal government in financial disarray, Campbell offers strategies that could help the administration get back its financial footing. He recommends spending less, creating balanced benefit plans for government employees and not printing more money than necessary as it will dilute the value of our currency, as some options that the government can consider.

This article also appears at: Yahoo! Finance, September 14, 2011.

September 7, 2011

How High Unemployment Hurts Your Investments

How High Unemployment Hurts Your Investments

Kelly Campbell, founder and president of Campbell Wealth Management, contributes an article to US News & World Report that discusses how high unemployment can hurt investments. Campbell explains that with a lack of jobs there is a lack of spending, which will ultimately keep the US in a stalled economic period. “A high unemployment rate can be hazardous to your financial health and the nation’s financial health,” Campbell says.

This article also appears at: Yahoo! Finance, September 7, 2011

August 31, 2011

Hurricane Irene: A Financial Disaster

Hurricane Irene: A Financial Disaster

In an article for US News & World Report, Kelly Campbell, founder and president of Campbell Wealth Management, discusses the financial devastation brought on by recent Hurricane Irene. He explains that while the storm could have been much worse, the financial damages still will have a toll on investors. “Our markets are already in turmoil, so be sure that property damage, higher prices and lost productivity will all have an impact on your investments.”

August 25, 2011

3 Lessons From the Sell-Off

3 Lessons From the Sell-Off

Kelly Campbell, founder and president of Campbell Wealth Management, writes an article for US News & World Report about lessons that investors can learn from the recent market dips. Campbell explains that investors cannot invest like they used to and that diversification is vital. He also offers that consumers allocate their portfolio to achieve a personal rate of return, or, the return that they need. “The market is different and you need to invest differently to achieve a competitive return with less risk,” he says.

August 17, 2011

3 Investment Opportunities in this Crazy Market

3 Investment Opportunities in this Crazy Market

US News & World Report features an article written by Kelly Campbell, founder and president of Campbell Wealth Management, about investment opportunities in the current market environment. Campbell explains that certain options, such as high-yield bonds and agricultural commodities are both positioned to do well. He also offers his insight on Japan and explains that since economic activity will likely pick up, “Getting in on the early stages of Japan’s rise will provide favorable returns for some time,” he says.

August 15, 2011

How to Tap Your Nest Egg In a Wild Market

How to Tap Your Nest Egg In a Wild Market

Catey Hill of SmartMoney.com quotes Kelly Campbell, founder and president of Campbell Wealth Management, in an article about how investors can best prepare their nest egg even in a volatile market. Given recent historical market gyrations, Campbell suggests that investors understand the importance of budgeting and creating a sound fiscal plan. ―Some of the most important lessons from 2008 were the importance of having a financial plan and really knowing how much you can spend,‖ he says.

August 10, 2011

What to Do When the Market Tanks

What to Do When the Market Tanks

US News & World Report features an article by Kelly Campbell, founder and president of Campbell Wealth Management, about what investors should do when the markets tank. Campbell offers suggestions for investors to consider, such as getting their financial house in order, remembering not to panic during market volatility and having an investment management plan in place. “Thinking through what you’ll do if the market has significant swings can help you get through a period of uncertainty,” he says.

August 10, 2011

How to endure the rocky markets’ horror show

How to endure the rocky markets’ horror show

Michelle Singletary of The Washington Post features Kelly Campbell, founder and president of Campbell Wealth Management, in an article about how investors can best endure the recent market plunges. Campbell compares the market activity to what happened during the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, given that incredible point losses occurred then as well. “Within three months, [the market] was back up to pre-9/11 numbers. Selling and going to cash would have locked in losses,” he explains.

August 3, 2011

3 Ways to Fix Your Own Debt Ceiling

3 Ways to Fix Your Own Debt Ceiling

US News & World Report features an article by Kelly Campbell, founder and president of Campbell Wealth Management, about strategies that investors can enlist to feel confident about making financial decisions, now that the debt ceiling issue is resolved. Campbell explains that putting together a complete and thorough budget is key as well as breaking down spending into your “wants and needs.” Contingency planning, he explains, is also one of the most vital things consumers can do. “Planning for the future must be accompanied by the harsh realities of ‘what if things don’t go as planned,’” he says.

November 10, 2010

The Elections are Over. For Investors, Now What?

The Elections are Over. For Investors, Now What?

Kelly Campbell, president and CEO of Campbell Wealth Management, discusses how the elections impact investors in a US News & World Report article. Campbell explains that no matter the election results, it is critical that Americans have financial goals and plans on reaching them. He advices to begin with the end in mind; write down end goals and map out steps to obtaining them.

November 1, 2010

Capital File Magazine – Three Steps to a Secure Retirement

Capital File Magazine – Three Steps to a Secure Retirement

Kelly Campbell, president and CEO of Campbell Wealth Management, offers advice on having a safe and sound retirement in Capitol File. Campbell says that it is important to decide what type of lifestyle you want to have in retirement. He explains that people need to make retirement goals and begin working towards them as soon as possible.

October 27, 2010

3 Reasons to Pay Attention to Taxes Before January 1

3 Reasons to Pay Attention to Taxes Before January 1

Kelly Campbell, president and CEO of Campbell Wealth Management, offers insight on the future of tax rates in a piece for US News & World Report. Campbell writes about tax strategies Americans should consider with the upcoming expiration of the Bush tax cuts. “Many people have considered the Roth conversion principally because when converting in 2010, the investor can spread the tax liability over 2011 and 2012. However, if the Bush tax cuts are not extended, tax rates in those two years will be higher and paying the tax in 2010 would be more beneficial,” explains Campbell.

October 20, 2010

3 Facts About the Election and the Economy

3 Facts About the Election and the Economy

Kelly Campbell, president and CEO of Campbell Wealth Management, offers insight on the midterm elections impacting the economy in a piece for US News & World Report. Campbell asserts that no matter the winning side, the economic issues our nation faces will not be fixed. Areas that need to be improved- such as taxes, inflation and unemployment- will not be changed overnight.

October 15, 2010

Are Your Aging Parents Making Sensible Financial Decisions?

Kelly Campbell, president and CEO of Campbell Wealth Management, discusses how to know when aging parents need help with their finances in a Boomer-Living.com article. Campbell explains the signs to be aware of.

October 13, 2010

Who Loses in a Foreclosure Moratorium?

Who Loses in a Foreclosure Moratorium?

Kelly Campbell, president and CEO of Campbell Wealth Management, weighs in on the foreclosure moratorium in a piece for US News & World Report. Campbell touches upon
the losses that ensue for the evictee, the new purchaser, the banks, the mortgage servicers, the regulators, the government and the homeowner/taxpayer. He explains, “Homeowners
and taxpayers will ultimately pay the price of higher fees and taxes.”

September 29, 2010

How to Tell if Your Broker is Looking Out for Your Best Interest

How to Tell if Your Broker is Looking Out for Your Best Interest

Kelly Campbell, president and CEO of Campbell Wealth Management, writes a piece for US News & World Report on how investors can tell if their brokers are looking out for their best interests. Campbell explains that commissioned brokers do not have the same fiduciary responsibility as the fee-based advisors do. “Congress has put forth legislation that could require all financial advisors to become fiduciaries,” says Campbell. “All financial advisors would have to put their clients’ interests first and have a requirement to meet with them once per year.”

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